34th Annual IEEE Computer Software and Applications Conference

Keynotes

Jin Pyo Hong
Jin Pyo Hong

Joint Presidential Opening Remarks

Jin Pyo Hong, President, KIISE
Tuesday, July 20, 2010

Jin Pyo Hong is the President of the Korea Institute of Information Scientists and Engineerins (KIISE). He served as the Vice President of KIISE from 2005 to 2007, and as the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of KIISE. He also served as the President of the Open Standards and Internet Association (OSIA), Korea, in 2004. Currently, he is a Professor at Department of Information and Communications Engineering, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Korea, and also served as the Dean of College of Engineering in 2000-02 and as the President of Institute of Information and Industrial Engineering in 1996–98. Before joining the university, he was the Director of Electronic and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Korea, from 1983 to 1995, after receiving his Doctorial degree from KAIST, and there lead several projects including CHILL compiler, SDL CASE tools for TDX-10 switching system software, Intelligent Network systems, and communications protocol standardization. He also contributed as the committee chair of IEEE ICOIN 2006, KCC 2006, KRnet 2003, KRnet 2004, HSN 2005, and as secretary-general of ICCC ’95. His current research interests include video multicasting for wireless environment, localization of wireless sensor networks, and mobile applications and systems.


Jim Isaak
Jim Isaak

Joint Presidential Opening Remarks

Jim Isaak, President, 2010, IEEE Computer Society
Tuesday, July 20, 2010

Jim Isaak is the 2010 President of the IEEE Computer Society. He served as the Division VIII Director of the IEEE Board of Directors in 2003-04. He has also served on several IEEE committees and helped to develop standards for engineering best practices. His 30 year career in industry has included acting as Director of Information Infrastructure Standards and Director of POSIX Standards with Digital Equipment, Director of Strategic Planning and Director of Marketing for Charles River Data Systems, and played various roles at other companies including Data General Corp, Intel, CALMA, and IBM. Isaak has also taught information technology courses at Southern New Hampshire University, Daniel Webster College, and Nashua Community College. Isaak is a strong advocate for active involvement in professional activities, going beyond just being a member of a society to participate in meetings, events, and responding to the "call for volunteers." According to Isaak, activity in professional organizations leads to increased innovation, development of leadership and team work skills, career development and Social Capital.


Norio Shiratori
Norio Shiratori

Joint Presidential Opening Remarks

Norio Shiratori, President, Information Processing Society of Japan (IPSJ)
Tuesday, July 20, 2010

Norio Shiratori is currently a Professor at Research Institute of Electrical Communication (RIEC), Tohoku University, Japan. Before moving to RIEC in 1993, he was the Professor of Information Engineering at Tohoku University from 1990 to 1993. Prior to that, he served as an Associate Professor and Research Associate at RIEC, Tohoku University, after receiving his Doctoral degree from Tohoku University in 1977. He was also served as the vice Director of RIEC, and IFIP representative of Japan. Now he is the President of IPSJ (Information Processing Society of Japan). He is a fellow of IEEE, IPSJ and IEICE. Professor Shiratori also contributes through serving as various capacities, such as: General Chair of the 9th IEEE ICOIN-9(1994), IFIP Joint International conference FORTE/PSTV'97, and 12th IEEE ICOIN-12 (1997); Program Chair of ICPADS'96 (1996) and ICPP-99 (1999). Dr. Shiratori was one of the leaders in Japan Gigabit Network (JGN) national project and headed several national projects such as, SCOPE - funded by Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications and Dynamic Networking project - sponsored by JSPS. He is currently leading two other national projects. Besides that, in 2006, the proposed idea of his research group on Mobile IPv6 was approved and standardized by IETF. He has proposed a new concept of Flexible Computing and still working in this direction. His recent research interest is in Ubiquitous and Symbiosis computing. He has published more than 15 books and over 400 refereed papers in computer science and related fields. He was the recipient of IPSJ Memorial Prize Wining paper award in 1985, Telecommunication Advancement Foundation Incorporation Award in 1991, Best Paper Award of ICOIN-9 in 1994, IPSJ Best Paper Award in 1997, and many others including the most recent Outstanding Paper Award of UIC-07 in 2007.


John Gustafson
John Gustafson

COMPSAC/SAINT Joint Keynote
Defining Computer "Speed": An Unsolved Challenge

John Gustafson, Director, Intel Labs Santa Clara
Tuesday, July 20, 2010

The reason we use computers is their speed, and the reason we use parallel computers is that they're faster than single-processor computers. Yet, after 70 years of electronic digital computing, we still do not have a solid definition of what computer 'speed' means, or even what it means to be 'faster.' Unlike measures in physics, where the definition of speed is rigorous and unequivocal, in computing it has no theoretical foundation that is universally accepted. As a result, computer customers have made purchases misguided by dubious information, computer designers have optimized their designs for the wrong goals, and computer programmers have chosen methods that optimize the wrong things. This talk describes why some of the obvious and historical ways of defining 'speed' haven't served us well, and the things we've learned in the struggle to find a definition that works.

Dr. John Gustafson is Director of Intel Labs Santa Clara. John is well known in High Performance Computing (HPC), having introduced the first commercial cluster system in 1985 and having first demonstrated 1000x, scalable parallel performance on real applications in 1988, for which he won the inaugural Gordon Bell Award. That demonstration created a watershed that led to the widespread manufacture and use of highly parallel computers. It also led to a counter-argument to Amdahl's law called Gustafson's law, that some now refer to as "weak scaling." He received the IEEE Computer Society’s Golden Core Award in 2007. He's also known for having led the reconstruction of the 1939 Atanasoff-Berry computer system A graduate of Caltech and Iowa State University, John was previously CEO of Massively Parallel Technologies, CTO of ClearSpeed Technology, and Principal Investigator at Sun Labs where he won and led Sun’s $47M DARPA High Productivity Computing Systems contract. His decisions in computer design are informed by his experience as an HPC user while at Ames Lab, Sandia, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

 
 


Kyo Chul Kang
Kyo Chul Kang

COMPSAC/SAINT Joint Keynote
Software Engineering vs. Product Line Engineering

Kyo Chul Kang, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, POSTECH, Korea
Wednesday, July 21, 2010

In my talk, I claim that “good” or “right” software engineering is product line engineering, and product line engineering shows what software engineering should be.

Any software artifacts we create will evolve as new features are added, and existing features are removed or modified, and, therefore, it is important to build softness (which we often call modifiability, adaptability, maintainability, etc.) into software when we design it. Product line engineering stimulates software engineers to think about the variability of software they create, and provides mechanisms to codify that knowledge. This variability information is the most critical knowledge for building softness into software and making software soft.

Feature-oriented domain analysis (FODA) was proposed twenty years ago as a method for “systematic discovery and exploitation of commonality across related software systems” to support software reuse. Since then, many industrial cases of FODA application have reported, the original model has been extended, and new paradigms such as generative programming and feature-oriented programming have been proposed based on the concept of “feature orientation.” The research community exploring feature orientation in software development has been growing significantly in recent years as evidenced by the large number of citations of the original work and the researches that followed. In my talk, I will review the salient features of FODA.


Dr. Kyo Chul Kang received his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1982. Since then he has worked as a visiting professor at the University of Michigan and as a member of technical staff at Bell Communications Research and AT&T Bell Laboratories before joining the Software Engineering Institute, Carnegie Mellon University as a senior member in 1987. He is currently a professor at the Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH) in Korea. He served as Director of the Software Engineering Center at Korea Information Technology Promotion Agency (KIPA) from 2001 to 2003. Also, he served as General Chair for the 8th International Conference on Software Reuse (ICSR) held in Madrid, Spain in 2004, and also as General Chair for the 11th and 14th International Software Product Line Conference held, respectively, in Kyoto, Japan in September 2007 and in Jeju, Korea in September, 2010.

While at the University of Michigan, he was involved in the development of PSL/PSA, a requirements engineering tool system, and a Meta modeling technique. Since then his research has focused on software reuse. The Feature-Oriented Domain Analysis (FODA) method he participated in the development at SEI has been widely accepted in the product line engineering community. While on leave to KIPA, he promoted the use of CMM in Korea. His current research areas include software reuse and product line engineering, requirements engineering, and computer-aided software engineering.




Tim Grance
Tim Grance

COMPSAC/SAINT Joint Keynote
Defining, Securing, and Standardizing Cloud Computing

Tim Grance, National Institute of Standards and Technology, USA
Thursday, July 22, 2010

This joint COMPSAC/SAINT keynote from Tim Grance will discuss the U.S. government's definition of cloud computing, then use that definition as a foundation upon which to discuss security advantages and challenges of cloud computing. Lastly, the need for interoperability and portability will be highlighted with a discussion of the state of cloud computing standards and possible future directions.

Tim Grance is a senior computer scientist in the Information Technology Laboratory at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. He leads a team of researchers in the Systems and Network Security Group and is engaged in a broad research program focused on such topics as cloud computing, access control, identity management, vulnerability analysis, privacy protections, security metrics, protocol security, smart cards, and wireless/mobile device security. He is also the Program Manager for Cyber and Network Security (CNS) Program and exercises broad technical and programmatic oversight over the NIST CNS portfolio. This portfolio includes high profile projects such as the NIST Hash Competition, Cloud Computing, Security Content Automation Protocol (SCAP), Protocol Security (DNS, BGP, IPv6), Combinatorial Testing, and the National Vulnerability Database. He has extensive public and private experience in accounting, law enforcement, counter-intelligence, and computer security. He has written on diverse topics including incident handling, intrusion detection, privacy, metrics, contingency planning, forensics, and identity management. He was named in 2003 to the Fed 100 by Federal Computer Week as one of the most influential people in Information Technology for the US Government. He is also is a two-time recipient of the highest award from the US Department of Commerce - a Gold Medal, from the Secretary of Commerce.



Hassan Gomaa
Hassan Gomaa

COMPSAC/SAINT Joint Keynote
Software Variability, Evolution, and Adaptation

Hassan Gomaa, George Mason University
Friday, July 23, 2010

This keynote presentation takes a software architecture-based perspective on variability, evolution and adaptation in software systems and applications. The presentation describes key elements of software modeling and design methods that promote reuse, variability management, evolution, and adaptation for software systems and product lines. Software variability analysis and modeling is used in software product line engineering to differentiate among common, optional, and variable software features, components and services. During software evolution, it is necessary to track variability in the software system as it evolves, and to differentiate among the different versions and components of the software architecture. Software adaptation addresses dynamically changing the software architecture and operational system at run-time to react to changes in the environment.

Hassan Gomaa is Chair and Full Professor in the Department of Computer Science at George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia, USA. He received his PhD in Computer Science from Imperial College of Science and Technology, London, UK. He has over 30 years experience in software engineering, both in industry and academia, and has published over 170 technical papers and three textbooks. His book, "Software Design Methods for Concurrent and Real-Time Systems", was published in 1993 and was translated into Chinese in 2003. His second book, entitled “Designing Concurrent, Distributed, and Real-Time Applications with UML”, was published in 2000 and was translated into Chinese in 2004. His latest textbook entitled “Designing Software Product Lines with UML” was published in 2005.

Dr. Gomaa’s current research interests include object-oriented modeling and design for concurrent, real-time, and distributed systems, software product line engineering, software architectures and patterns, service-oriented architectures, and dynamic software adaptation. His research has been funded by several organizations including the National Science Foundation, NASA and DARPA.

Dr. Gomaa was keynote speaker at the Asia-Pacific Software Engineering Conference in December 2004, at the International Conference on Model-Driven Engineering, Languages, and Systems in October 2006, and at the International Conference on Software Engineering Advances in November 2008. He has taught several in-depth industrial courses on software modeling and design in North America, Europe, Japan, and Korea. He also consults in both the technical and management aspects of software engineering.



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